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Automation Technologies 3/2014

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Automation Technologies 3/2014

SensorS and Measurement

SensorS and Measurement back to current issue Fuelling up on gas produced from wind power Sven Heuer More and more renewable energy is being produced around the world. At peak times, wind power and its likes even produce “too much” power. One option to store excess energy is to convert it into gas. For this purpose, Audi had the largest power to gas plant in the world set up by Etogas GmbH – with measuring technology by Endress + Hauser. Sven Heuer, marketing manager communication at Endress + Hauser in Weil am Rhein, Germany The conversion of use of fossil and nuclear fuels into regenerative energies is fully underway in many parts of the world. Germany is one of the pioneers in this area. The energy turnaround is often cited. By 2022, all nuclear power plants in Germany are to be switched off, and CO 2 -emissions clearly reduced by 2020. These resolutions have led to great investments in renewable energies, specifically in wind power and photovoltaics. The high share of infeed regenerative energy leads to conventional power plants having to adjust their production to solar irradiation and wind power. The advanced development of wind power and photovoltaics, however, also leads to peak outputs during which more energy than needed is produced. Experts have long been trying to solve the question of how to sensibly use this overproduction — after all, there are no long-term solutions for power storage. Audi AG offers an approach to using otherwise unused energy AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGIES 3/2014

SensorS and Measurement next page potentials with its new methanisation plant in Lower Saxony. The plant converts excess power to fuel. The production of methane is monitored by measuring technology by Endress + Hauser. Storing power in the gas grid In the methanisation plant, the “Power-to- Gas”(P2G)-procedure is used to convert renewable power to synthetic, CO 2 -neutral methane and make it storable by feeding it into the natural gas grid. The procedure has been developed by plant constructor Etogas together with leading research institutes. The procedure permits taking up larger shares of renewable power in the energy system. The present natural gas grid becomes the supporting pillar of the renewable energy system and supplies the storage and transport capacities absent from the mains. The plant in Werlte has been built by Etogas. Endress + Hauser meters were used for all sensitive measuring points of the hydrogen factors, the reactor system and the subsequent preparation route. Tolga Akertek, Etogas‘ officer for the process-engineering plant equipment and commissioning of the P2Gplant, about the cooperation with the measuring About Company name: Endress + Hauser AG Headquarters: Reinach, Switzerland Turnover: 1,693,790 EUR (2012) Employees: 10,066 (2012) Products: measurement systems for flow, level, pressure, analysis, temperature, data acquisition, system controls technology specialist: in the planning phase, Wolfgang Best and Peter Pasemann, application consultant of Endress + Hauser, were already able to help out. Reliability of the measuring devices is of top priority to us. This is why we chose Endress + Hauser. Audi set out in uncharted territory in the area of energy production and storage by starting up its 6-MW plant in the Emsland. The company promises new options of environmentally compatible, comfortable and individual mobility with acceptable ranges for car drivers. Since its commissioning in late 2013, the plant has fed the synthetically generated “e-gas” into the public natural gas mains at the site. It is planned to provide an annual amount of about 1,000 t of the synthetic end product in future. 01 Partial view of Audi‘s Power-to-Gas plant in Werlte: in the front, the biogas treatment plant, in the back the electrolysis hall and to the right the reactor tower AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGIES 3/2014

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